Fondue is not for the faint of cheese heart

A couple of weeks ago, I curated a fondue party at my house as a last celebration of winter, and to explore the chemistry of melted cheeses.  

We had four courses of fondue served at three different tables in the house:
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Cheese Caramel Fondue  
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The savory courses were paired with fresh homemade baked sourdough bread with our new starter that my boyfriend and I lovingly named "Schemp," as well as roasted marinated balsamic mushrooms, spicy butternut squash, herbed potatoes, honeyed brussel sprouts, and charred broccoli and cauliflower.  A colorful kale, cabbage, carrot, pepper salad served as the palate cleanser.

The sweet fondues were paired with green apple, strawberries, oranges, and an olive oil orange cake.

The theme was also late 60s, early 70s, which is actually the timeframe when fondue became extremely popular.  Fondue is in fact making a comeback, according to Eater and their latest article that came out on it on March 3rd.  Despite how you feel about fondue, it is a known fact: melty cheese in something pleasing to the eye and the stomach. Fondue is rich and filling.  Pair it with fruit, vegetables, and bread, and you can feed a large gathering.  And it's an excuse to throw a very cheesy party, in spirit and in taste.  Fondue is fun and messy. Leave your scruples at the door, and embrace the warmth of the fondue pot.

I featured a medley of cheeses in my fondue, as I requested guests BYOW (Bring Your Own Wedge).  Some notable cheeses featured were Lissome by Boxcarr Handmade Cheese, Midnight Moon by Cypress Grove, Prairie Breeze Cheddar by Milton Creamery, and Fontina AOP. 

Fondue cooking note: Be sure to tend to the pots of fondue as they sit heated.  I had multiple stations of fondue at my party, and occasionally needed to pour a splash of wine so that the fondue would not get too thick.


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